Our Tennis Thread

Postby emate007 » Sat, 18 Feb 2012 08:41

Ugadalou wrote:It's not about how forgiving a racquet is, it's about being able to easily maneuver, swing with it and learn to accelerate when hitting.


I understood your point entirely. I just disagree with your opinion.

Ugadalou wrote:Plus I don't agree that heavier racquets are more powerful, since they are designed to generate almost zero power and let the player produce most of it so that they get full control on their shots.
An oversized head heavy racquet generates more power by itself at contact (catapult effect on stringbed) than an advanced level stick.

That's why on the specs of every player's racquet the ''power level'' lists always as ''low''.


Force= Mass*Acceleration
Unless a racket is far too heavy for you to swing at even close to normal speed, heavier is more powerful.
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Postby Moralspain » Sat, 18 Feb 2012 09:12

Rob ITST wrote:As far as weight, my rule of thumb is that you should use the heaviest racquet that doesn't slow your swing down, but also light enough that you can continue to swing fast throughout a long match.


So true, 340-345 gr strung and 7 points head light, that works for me
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Postby L Sanchez MD » Sat, 18 Feb 2012 11:42

Rob ITST wrote:Based on what I see, I'd probably recommend a racquet with a head size of 95-100 sq inches, 290-310 grams, and a swingweight of around 300-315. That will also give you a racquet you can use as your game improves, by making small customizations to the weight and strings.


Good spot. That's actually the exact weight I feel most comfortable with - around 300-310 (and 95 sq inches).
I think racquets around 270 tend to feel flimsy and lack stability, which is why I prefer the heavier ones.

But still, the 377g one is insane.
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Postby Samael » Sat, 18 Feb 2012 11:49

This thread has motivated me to film some of my tennis practice sessions. Will wait for the spring to come though before i do that.
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Postby djarvik » Sat, 18 Feb 2012 14:43

@Ugadalou - just so you should know, you are arguing with two world class stringers :lol: 8)


@Dragos - can't wait! :twisted:
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Postby Rob ITST » Sat, 18 Feb 2012 15:44

Ugadalou wrote:That's why on the specs of every player's racquet the ''power level'' lists always as ''low''.


There's other reasons for that, and none of them are because of the weight of the racquet:

Head size - player's racquets almost always have smaller heads, which give less power.

Stiffness - player's frames are generally more flexible. Flexible racquets are less powerful when you miss the sweet spot. They are less forgiving, which also means they give you more feedback.

A lot of it comes down to what the player's intentions are. If you want instant gratification, and don't care as much about actually improving your game, then a more forgiving racquet is good. But if you want the feedback that's necessary to improve in the long run, then a player's frame is better. In other words: a "game improvement" racquet will help you play better, but a player's racquet will help you become a better player.
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Postby djarvik » Sat, 18 Feb 2012 15:52

L Sanchez MD wrote:We played today and recorded some serves, volleys, and a couple more rallies.

Was trying to remember all the different tips, but didn't always manage to.

My serve is atrocious - I'm well aware of this. One of the main reasons I want some lessons...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hgat5-PgNuY



Ahh, already making progress :)

Notice in your first few forehands where you finish. Your arm and wrist still seem to be very tense. They finish almost as a straight line with the racket. Let it fly, relax, let the racket "wrap" around you after the shot. I know it feels like you have less control hitting in this way, but believe me, it is the complete opposite.

Keep pointing at the ball with your left hand and finding it. Notice how as soon as you "skimp" on this - you are getting pushed and the ball gets too close to your body and you cant swing at it.


Start by holding the racket with your left hand at the throat and with your right hand (completely relaxed and NOT squeezing the racket) on the grip. As soon as you know the ball is going to forehand side, move that racket while still holding the same way to your right hip, so the butt of the racket points just to the side of the hip. Look at the incoming ball, start pointing at the ball and start your slow take back, it should happen almost at the same time. When the ball is in front of your hand - hit it by brushing up and across, relax your arm and allow your racket to follow through and "wrap" around you.

It is important that the only detail you notice about the take back at this point is that it is a rather slow process. Don't be concerned with how far is the take back or how high. If you attempt to hit the ball harder with this mentality, your arm will speed up the take back and will take it further back on its own, without you spending your scarce resource on the court for it - your brain. The more things to remember, the faster the game will seem to you. Free your mind and the game will feel like it is in slow motion.

Look at your Forehand at 1:00. Replicate it. This one looks decent.

Another little tip you should incorporate, but only if you feel you hit a few good forehands in a raw is your elbow, try moving it away from your body, almost picking it up a bit as you find the ball and point your left arm at the ball. This will accomplish a ton down the road for you, but for now it will stop you from "jamming", from hitting the ball too close to your body.

If you thinking about your feet - stop. If you thinking you need to be stationary when hitting the ball - stop. At this point these should not be your concerns. Anything below the waste is none-existent as far as I am concerned. If you have time and desire, I can give you some off-court exercises that will translate into a better movement on court.

Volleys:

Practice catch volleys. Open your racket and think "catch", not "hit". Some volleys maybe short, but this is the best way to get a feel at the net. As you getting a few of them over the net, move from "catch" to block a bit. When catching you let the ball push your racket back a bit, with block you don't, hold it firmer. As you feel comfortable blocking you can move to punch.

There are many different theories on volley technique. Some say volley is all hands, some say the weight should come from the body as you turn. I think this is very individual. Volley is feel first, technique is close second. If you don't have the feel, you can spend years on technique and still look robotic and miss the most simple volleys.

You need to go to the coach for the serve. To many things are wrong with it to be honest. If the coach is good, he will be able to construct the serve around your current and most comfortable motion. They easiest way to see if he is doing the right thing for you is to simply listen to him, do what he says. What you looking for is that instant "WOW, this feels easy". If what he tells you doesn't feel easy and comfortable - he is trying to go outside your comfort zone and reconstruct from scratch. I find that if you do that, your serve will always be shaky.

You do seem to have a decent basics down, you hit the side of the ball, and that is a big thing already, trust me :lol:

Good luck!
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Postby Moralspain » Sat, 18 Feb 2012 16:04

L Sanchez MD wrote:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubGy_uxyGJ0


0:36, nice cross-court shot :D
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Postby L Sanchez MD » Fri, 24 Feb 2012 14:10

djarvik wrote:
L Sanchez MD wrote:We played today and recorded some serves, volleys, and a couple more rallies.

Was trying to remember all the different tips, but didn't always manage to.

My serve is atrocious - I'm well aware of this. One of the main reasons I want some lessons...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hgat5-PgNuY



Ahh, already making progress :)

Notice in your first few forehands where you finish. Your arm and wrist still seem to be very tense. They finish almost as a straight line with the racket. Let it fly, relax, let the racket "wrap" around you after the shot. I know it feels like you have less control hitting in this way, but believe me, it is the complete opposite.

Keep pointing at the ball with your left hand and finding it. Notice how as soon as you "skimp" on this - you are getting pushed and the ball gets too close to your body and you cant swing at it.


Start by holding the racket with your left hand at the throat and with your right hand (completely relaxed and NOT squeezing the racket) on the grip. As soon as you know the ball is going to forehand side, move that racket while still holding the same way to your right hip, so the butt of the racket points just to the side of the hip. Look at the incoming ball, start pointing at the ball and start your slow take back, it should happen almost at the same time. When the ball is in front of your hand - hit it by brushing up and across, relax your arm and allow your racket to follow through and "wrap" around you.

It is important that the only detail you notice about the take back at this point is that it is a rather slow process. Don't be concerned with how far is the take back or how high. If you attempt to hit the ball harder with this mentality, your arm will speed up the take back and will take it further back on its own, without you spending your scarce resource on the court for it - your brain. The more things to remember, the faster the game will seem to you. Free your mind and the game will feel like it is in slow motion.

Look at your Forehand at 1:00. Replicate it. This one looks decent.

Another little tip you should incorporate, but only if you feel you hit a few good forehands in a raw is your elbow, try moving it away from your body, almost picking it up a bit as you find the ball and point your left arm at the ball. This will accomplish a ton down the road for you, but for now it will stop you from "jamming", from hitting the ball too close to your body.

If you thinking about your feet - stop. If you thinking you need to be stationary when hitting the ball - stop. At this point these should not be your concerns. Anything below the waste is none-existent as far as I am concerned. If you have time and desire, I can give you some off-court exercises that will translate into a better movement on court.

Volleys:

Practice catch volleys. Open your racket and think "catch", not "hit". Some volleys maybe short, but this is the best way to get a feel at the net. As you getting a few of them over the net, move from "catch" to block a bit. When catching you let the ball push your racket back a bit, with block you don't, hold it firmer. As you feel comfortable blocking you can move to punch.

There are many different theories on volley technique. Some say volley is all hands, some say the weight should come from the body as you turn. I think this is very individual. Volley is feel first, technique is close second. If you don't have the feel, you can spend years on technique and still look robotic and miss the most simple volleys.

You need to go to the coach for the serve. To many things are wrong with it to be honest. If the coach is good, he will be able to construct the serve around your current and most comfortable motion. They easiest way to see if he is doing the right thing for you is to simply listen to him, do what he says. What you looking for is that instant "WOW, this feels easy". If what he tells you doesn't feel easy and comfortable - he is trying to go outside your comfort zone and reconstruct from scratch. I find that if you do that, your serve will always be shaky.

You do seem to have a decent basics down, you hit the side of the ball, and that is a big thing already, trust me :lol:

Good luck!


Thanks again for more helpful advice! :)
I used those tips the next time we played, and it was much better already (although there was also much less wind :D )
Looking for a coach now..!
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Postby L Sanchez MD » Tue, 20 Mar 2012 17:51

Looking for a fairly cheap racquet to replace my current one...

Thoughts about either of these?

Dunlop Pulse G100
280g strung weight, 100 sq. inch head

Dunlop Tr 200
305g strung weight, 98 sq. inch head
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Postby Rob ITST » Wed, 21 Mar 2012 01:34

I'm not sure I've ever heard of those - which means one of 2 things:

They are racquets that I am familiar with, but with different names.

Or, they are really cheap racquets - meaning, not just low price, but also low quality.

I don't know about other markets, but here in the US we have a lot of really good racquets at great deals. I sell a ton of racquets for under $100 - racquets that went for twice that amount last year. They're just previous year models that the factories are getting rid of.

One of my favorites is the Wilson K Surge. 100 sq in, 294 grams, and you can get them for about $89.
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Postby L Sanchez MD » Wed, 21 Mar 2012 01:47

Rob ITST wrote:I'm not sure I've ever heard of those - which means one of 2 things:

They are racquets that I am familiar with, but with different names.

Or, they are really cheap racquets - meaning, not just low price, but also low quality.

I don't know about other markets, but here in the US we have a lot of really good racquets at great deals. I sell a ton of racquets for under $100 - racquets that went for twice that amount last year. They're just previous year models that the factories are getting rid of.

One of my favorites is the Wilson K Surge. 100 sq in, 294 grams, and you can get them for about $89.


I have found some racquets along those sort of prices that you're mentioning. I'll have a look for the K Surge...
Thanks for the advice :)

Edit:
Is this it?
http://www.sportsdirect.com/wilson-surg ... ket-743070
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Postby Rob ITST » Wed, 21 Mar 2012 01:59

Even better - that's the BLX Surge. I didn't mention that one because the supplies are much more limited than the [K]Factor.

That racquet is basically a lighter version of the Babolat Pure Drive. If it's too light, you can easily apply some lead tape to weigh it down a bit.
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Postby L Sanchez MD » Wed, 21 Mar 2012 02:01

Ahh okey, cool!
I found a K surge for cheaps on ebay.
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Wilson-K-Surg ... 793wt_1163

But I'm very cautious about buying racquets off ebay since my brother has got some fake badminton ones from there...

What are the playing characteristics of those Wilsons anyhow?
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Postby Rob ITST » Wed, 21 Mar 2012 02:05

Never buy new racquets on E-bay. There are two types of new racquets on Ebay - fakes, and ones that are being sold by people who are "cheating" (such as teaching pros who sell the racquets they are supposed to be playing with).

As far as the playing characteristics - it's much like many racquets out today. Medium power/control, good spin, fairly forgiving.
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